Fake Solar Eclipse Glasses Are Flooding the Market: How to Stay Safe

Update: The Federal Trade Commission has released a statement with safety guidlines for solar viewing glasses. 

If you’re planning to view the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, make sure you’ve got the right safety gear.

Phony eclipse glasses are currently flooding the marketplace, according to the American Astronomical Society (AAS). This counterfeit equipment falsely claims to meet the international standard for safe solar viewing, which is known as ISO 12312-2 (also written as ISO 12312-2:2015).

So how do you know that your eclipse glasses or handheld viewers are safe? You can’t really check them yourself; doing so requires pretty high-tech lab equipment. But the AAS has done such legwork for you and identified a number of reputable suppliers, including (but not limited to) American Paper Optics, Rainbow Symphony, Celestron and Daystar. You can also trust the businesses and other organizations that sell gear made by these companies, AAS representatives said. (There are many such retailers, including Wal-Mart, Lowes and Toys R Us.) [The Best ISO-Certified Gear to See the 2017 Solar Eclipse]

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Wedding photographer awarded $1.08M in defamation lawsuit against bride and groom

DPReview

Photographers are cheering the end of a marathon lawsuit today, a case that pinned beleaguered wedding photographer Andrea Polito against blogger Neely Moldovan and her husband, who set out to destroy her career after a minor disagreement over their wedding photos.

The whole dispute began over a $125 photo album cover that the couple didn’t want to pay for.